Category Archives: “rapid software testing”

Seeing the Wood For the Trees

I’ve recently been reading through my ISEB Practitioner notes, which I got when attending a course organised by Grove Consultants a few years back.

Don’t switch off yet. I know I mentioned ISEB. So before I go further, it’s worth stating my thoughts on the whole ISEB/ISTQB debate. I summed up my frustrations in a previous blog post; the fact that in the UK having ISTQB certification is practically the only way to get past the recruiters gate, but I also feel that there is some merit to the courses if taught properly, and followed up with a context driven approach such as Rapid Software Testing.

Reading back through my notes from Grove I can now see that this is what they were trying to work towards. At the time I had no idea how important the context driven school of testing was, nor the work of James Bach, Michael Bolton, Cem Kaner and others. But looking in the notes, the names are there. The techniques, albeit in nowhere near the detail that James or Michael teach in class of course, were hinted at and some approaches, particularly Exploratory Testing, are mentioned in some detail. Some slides are directly referenced from James and Michael’s work.

Unfortunately, due to the need to pass the exam, and with these areas being marked as ‘not exam’ then I didn’t pay them the attention that they warranted, and so it took a few more years to discover how and why the context driven approach can be so powerful. Which maybe shows the true problem with ISEB/ ISTQB certification after all.

More Experiences of Rapid Test Management

If you remember from the last post, I recently attended Rapid Test Management, taught by Michael Bolton in London. For a general overview and what happened in the first day then take a look at the previous post. As before, the following caveat applies:

Caveat – this is not a list of exactly what happens in a Rapid Test Management class, nor is it a list of exercises and course material. You won’t become good at Rapid Test Management by reading this post. Sometimes I forget things. If you really want to know about Rapid Test Management then you need to sign up for the class. It will be money well spent and this post will tell you a little about what might happen if you do take the class.

We started day two talking about test strategy and how one might incorporate Rapid Software Testing into a test strategy. The Heuristic Test Strategy model was introduced and we studied this in some detail, and followed it up with an exercise to define a strategy for a smartphone. I was happy with the choice of product under test, given my background then it made it easier to take into account my domain knowledge, and so our group could come up with a large number of options to consider. Equally interesting was what other groups had come up with and it was very interesting to see how each group had approached the problem differently and come up with different solutions. This goes to show that diversity in teams and experience is very important in testing.

Back on day 1 we had produced a list of areas that we, as a group, wanted the class to be focused upon and the major areas that so far had not been covered were risk and test coverage. As usual, Michael had some great experiences to share and course material to cover the risk areas and the details of risk based testing. In fact, the amount of class material was another one of the great things about this class – you get a lot, far more than you can look at or can be taught in the class itself. Together with some useful testing tools and also some more exercises and demo’s, this gives a great set of material to use afterwards. Continual learning is important and so to gain access to all the notes, examples and slides is just the start.

Day 2 was concluded with a look at test coverage and ways to visualise test coverage. Rapid Software Testing provides you with some great ways to do this, from the simple to the more complex. It got me thinking about how I might incorporate this into the Kanban project management processes that my own team use to manage our work.

So, should you sign-up for the class? You bet’cha. Rapid Test Management is a class that you should attend. If you want it to, and you take the time to study all the information and material that you receive, then it will make you a better tester and it will make you a better test manager. I’m on the way; I’m just beginning to take on-board all I’ve learnt and to read through the material we didn’t cover in class, but with everything I read I’m confident that it’s improving my skills.

Experiences of Rapid Test Management

Caveat – this is not a list of exactly what happens in a Rapid Test Management class, nor is it a list of exercises and course material. You won’t become good at Rapid Test Management by reading this post. Sometimes I forget things. If you really want to know about Rapid Test Management then you need to sign up for the class. It will be money well spent and this post will tell you a little about what might happen if you do take the class.

Last week I had the opportunity to attend one of the first Rapid Test Management classes, and certainly the first one to have been run in the UK. It was a great experience and the beginning of a lot more learning. There were attendees from a number of different areas of software testing and together I think we formed a very effective group, learning from each other and sharing experiences.

Rapid Test Management follows on from the Rapid Software Testing class that James Bach and Michael Bolton teach. I’d attended James’ class in Cambridge at the beginning of March and so, with the class material and my ideas rolling around in my head, I pitched up at the Hilton hotel in leafy Kensington (well almost Shepherds Bush actually) for two days of intensive learning from Michael.

Rapid Software Testing is a context driven technique, intended to enable testers to excel at our chosen craft. Since it focuses on testing as a craft itself, instead of merely on the production of test cases and then their use for testing (or it could be argued merely for checking) then this does put some questions in mind when considering how best to manage it. By way of some preparation, I noted down some of the questions that I had:

  • How can I best manage each testers time when adopting a Rapid Testing based strategy.
  • How does estimation fit in with the Rapid Software Testing ethos?
  • How can I sell the idea of Rapid Software Testing not only to those within my team who may be sceptical, but more importantly to those who manage me, who are most likely not only sceptical but also less knowledgeable about software testing in general?

Day 1

The class was split into two days, the first morning focused mostly on refreshing understanding of Rapid Software Testing and ensuring that, as a group, we had effectively collected our own desired outcomes from the class. It was good to spend some time going back over the methodology itself even though I had learnt it very recently. It was great that Michael seemed happy to tailor the class to the audience in any way that was necessary, taking a lot of time to ensure that everyone’s opinion could be heard.

What I found great about this class, and the RST course, are the little nuggets of information, stories and quotes that James and Michael pass on. Looking back through my notes from this class I find that’s what I mostly write down, quotes like:

 “Quality is value to someone who matters”

“Testers tell stories about products”

We also spoke in depth about the testers Elevator Pitch, that two minutes where you have to explain what testing is all about. Being able to explain and justify the role of testers and test teams is a critical skill and Rapid Software Testing gives you that skill.

When implementing any changes, such as introducing Rapid Test Management for example, then it’s critical to take into account the existing knowledge and processes that are already in use. Michael stressed the importance of ensuring that it’s not only the documented processes that are considered; in fact it’s the informal processes that are far more important to understand. He spoke about tacit vs explicit knowledge and how it is important for managers to be aware of the tacit knowledge in a test team and not merely the explicit knowledge.

We then took a look at how to put together a good team and how to train a new tester who was coming onto the team, through guidance and suitable heuristics. It was great to discuss with the others in the class about the issues they had faced when coming into a new team or bringing new team members in and also what had gone well. Ensuring that people are trained in a fault tolerant environment and gradually introduced to new tasks may seem fairly obvious stuff but it’s  often over-looked, as is the need to ensure that feedback is both given and asked for from new team members.

Day 1 concluded with a look at metrics and how important they really are, v.s. how important most organisations seem to think they are. Michael pointed us towards Cem Kaner and Walter Bond’s paper Software Engineering Metrics: What Do They Measure and How Do We Know which I would definitely recommend reading.

 

Find out what happened on day 2 soon…

Test Leadership vs. Test Management – Is the Balance Right?

As I’ve blogged about recently, I’ve been recently studying for the Level 5 Certificate in Management and Leadership from the Chartered Management Institute. I’m now three sessions into the four session course, and it’s getting really interesting to see and think about how one might apply general management principles more specifically to the software testing area.

The most recent session was all about Management and Leadership. As part of this we did an exercise where we had to sort out a number of different phrases into groups that either apply to ‘Management’ or ‘Leadership’. No sitting on the fence, no spending hours deciding which to put where, but a quick exercise to make you think. There  were right and wrong answers (although primarily to seed further discussion).

The list, as I saw it, is below. What do you think? Do you agree?

Leadership Management
Enables others Implements and maintains
Inspires vision Focus on systems and structures
Encourages head and heart Adopt short term view
Acts authentically Completes transactions
Asks what and why Asks how and when
Has long range perspective Brings order and coordination
Focuses on doing the right thing Focuses on doing things right
Inspires trust Accomplishes tasks through others
Acts as an innovator Focuses on performance
Challenges Provides stability
Transforms Controls
Committed to the cause Imitates
Gives purpose and meaning Complies
Focus on people

After the exercise I got thinking about how I might apply this more generally to software testing. Specifically to Test Managements vs. Test Leadership, i.e. what separates those who run testing projects, probably as part of the design and delivery of a specific product, vs. those who lead groups and provide inspiration both inside those groups, and to the wider testing community. Are the skills needed in those situations different?

We clearly need within our community those who can challenge and innovate. Right now this is coming mostly from the context-driven community as I see it, where also the vision and long range perspective is clearly evident. These people are driving things along nicely in my opinion. As someone who has recently attending Rapid Software Testing with James Bach then I can say first hand that he’s certainly encouraging head and heart. I don’t need to mention challenging, right?

The question then comes, who is taking things further? Leaders need managers to take their vision and turn it into practice. They need someone who can focus on the short term view, give the control and ensure completion. They need people who implement. As a community do we currently have enough of the managers listening and implementing the vision that our leaders are sharing?

Experiences of Rapid Software Testing

Last week I had the pleasure of attending Rapid Software Testing training, organised by The Ministry of Testing. Rapid Software Testing is a technique popularised by James Bach and Michael Bolton and hopefully is not something new to you, but in case it is then I’d recommend looking at James Bach’s website. He explains it much better than me :)

The course was in Cambridge in the UK, and after a quick and easy train ride up then it was easy to find the hotel, dump the bags, and then go out to the Software Testing Club Meetup. This was a good start to the course, an initial networking event which James also attended, as well as a lot of local testers who were not attending the course. We had some great discussions and I met a lot of new people; you can see some photos from the event which have been posted up by Rosie, the organiser.

Day 1

Then to the first day of the course itself. From the moment the course started it was apparent that this was not your typical technical course. James’ style is well—known, just search YouTube if you want to see him in action, and he carried this into the course itself. He certainly knows his stuff, and presents in typical provocative style and is capable of causing many eureka moments. It’s very enjoyable, but initially tough, stuff.

We focused mostly in the first day on what Rapid Software Testing is, and the overall philosophy of the techniques. Rapid Software Testing is most useful to encourage testers to defend and think for themselves from a position of technical authority, especially useful in periods of uncertainty. Plenty of examples were given and James was able to draw upon his many years of experience in testing, both hardware and software. The time went by quickly and there was plenty of audience participation. James’ style is very much to put the audience members on the spot and ask some very difficult and blunt questions in order to replicate the pressures that testers can feel as part of project teams. To a few this comes naturally, but to most of the audience, this was a long way out of the comfort zone. We tried to help out whoever had been picked for a particular challenge, in order that the class as a whole could benefit.

The day concluded with an exercise on testing some everyday objects. Sounds simple, right? Well no. In case you will go on the course yourself then I will not give too much away, but suffice to say that there is much more to testing something which appears simple, than one at first thinks. It’s these sorts of exercises that open the mind and help learning.

Day 2

After a good dinner with some new software testing friends, and a decent night’s sleep, it was time for day 2. Here we went into more details of Rapid Software Testing and the relevant testing models. Again the examples given were general, intended to make you think like a tester irrespective of your background, and plenty of pressure was applied to those who James selected from the audience. We looked at the differences between scripted and un-scripted testing and exploded some myths about both areas. We also talked a lot about oracles and why they are essential in testing. As an example, I was surprised to find that a person can be considered as oracle.

We also discussed heuristics a lot. Rapid Software Testing has many heuristics, the fact that James can remember and explain them all straight from his head is somewhat impressive. As with a lot of the techniques and information, a fair amount of common sense thinking was clearly applied when inventing the heuristics, but it was good to get names put to techniques that I was using already, for consistency if nothing else. There is a danger of quoting too many heuristics of course, especially when dealing with other’s within project teams and management. James’ view seems to be that by bombarding those outside of testing with information and explanations, using the relevant heuristics, that testers gain legitimacy. I do not agree with his approach to the length that he presents it – clearly testers need to be able to explain themselves – but there is a danger of losing credibility if too many heuristics are invented and then explained, which merely represent ‘day-to-day’ work. Take a look at James’ slides and see if you agree.

By the end of the day we were questioning practically everything about testing and about the way we were working. There is a danger from this course that one starts to question too much but one needs to start small and work up I think. That’s certainly what I intend to do.

Day 3

The final day of the course started bright and early with more of the same. We focused on exploratory testing again, with more details, and talked a lot about documentation, metrics and information. The idea of focusing on a particular testing task, using some heuristics, but knowing when it is not working and de-focusing at this point, was a great learning for me. We also went into more detail on exploratory and session based techniques, something which I wish we had spent a bit more time on in previous days.

The main exercise for the day was based around finding a pattern for a system based upon dice. I won’t go into too many details on this (it’s explained pretty well at Better Testing) and also I do not want to give away a potential solution to anyone. But suffice to say it was a great opportunity to put into practice some of the techniques that we had learnt. Our group were not the quickest but neither were we the slowest, and it was certainly a good challenge.

The day then concluded with a wrap-up and overview of what we had learnt. Then some brief goodbyes and swapping of LinkedIn invites, and home to try and make sense of a busy three days and how what I had learnt could be applied to myself and the team members in my teams.

Overall

If you get the chance to go on Rapid Software Testing then go. Don’t think too hard about it, the course if very worthwhile and you will get a lot out of it. It is not easy, you will most likely feel uncomfortable at times with the training approach and some of the content may well seem obvious on first pass. But once you think more, and you start to question your own approach, with the techniques, tools, and even just the words, to back-up what you already know, then this course should make you a better tester. It would have been good to have seen a little more on session based techniques in detail and more about the tools that can be used, but I understand James does a separate course on this.

Thanks also go to Rosie Sherry, the course organiser. This was the first course that The Ministry of Testing have organised and if this first one is anything to go by then Ministry of Testing has a bright future. The venue and organisation was great, there was a really friendly, small company feel about things, and it was very easy to meet new people and learn together. Definitely three days well spent.

Learning Time

Tomorrow I’m leaving the safety of the South to journey far North* for something that I’ve been looking forward to for a long time. I’ve been fortunate enough to be able to sign-up for James Bach’s Rapid Software Testing course which has been arranged by The Ministry of Testing in Cambridge.

To say I’ve been looking forward to this for a while would be an understatement. Unfortunately due to budget constraints then it’s not been possible for me to get on courses like this in the past few years but ‘fortunately’ now that things are closing, then there’s a bit more money available for training and this will be money very well spent.

First stop is the Software Testing Club meetup tomorrow in Cambridge then on Wednesday the course starts. I don’t know what to expect but if it’s three days of hard but rewarding learning then I will be very happy. Having already taken a look at the course outline and slides then I’m sure it will be.

I’ll try and blog daily about my experiences, assuming I have the time and brain power left to do so :)

 

* (non-UK readers – we have a big North-South joke thing going on in the UK. If a place is north of Watford, which is a bit north of London, then us native southerners joke we’re out of the safety of the south and that it’s grim up north :) Even though it isn’t and Cambridge is not even in really in the north anyway).

Rapid Software Testing

If you have a chance today then I would recommend reading this article on Rapid Software Testing. It’s an interview with Michael Bolton and gives a great overview of the approach and methodolgy.

I’m signed up for James Bach’s only UK course in March to learn much more about Rapid Software Testing. I cannot wait.

Steve

If you want to sign-up for the course too then you really should. It’s organised by The Ministry of Testing, the new offshoot from Software Testing Club. A 3-day, hands-on class on March 7 – 9th 2012 in Cambridge, UK. Hope to see you there.

Little and Often

New Year brings new beginnings, new starts, new ideas and for some New Year’s resolutions. I’ve been reading, with a lot of interest, zenhabits.net recently and the post How to Have the Best Year of Your Life (without Setting a Single Goal) particularly caught my eye. do we set ourselves too many goals and resolutions, and are they ultimately doomed to fail?

With that in mind, here’s my plan for this year, sorry, I mean here are some practices :) I intend to engage in through the year which I hope will help me and others.

  • Blog little and blog often: Easy to say of course but more difficult to do. But often you spend too much time thinking about what to say and the moment is wasted. So I intend to start practicing regular blogging, but posts will be shorter. Not as short as my posts on Twitter but a little shorter than last years more lengthy ones.
  • Get back to getting my hands dirty: It’s time to start doing some testing again and not just managing and talking about it. This really is a practice not a goal, becoming part of my DNA again. As a start I’ve signed up for James Bach’s excellent Rapid Software Testing class which The Ministry of Testing are bringing to the UK this year. Can’t wait :)
  • Widen my circle of contacts: Obvious really, I’d like to learn more from others outside of my regular circle of contacts. Do you want to talk about something or help me out?
  • Practice generosity: Directly from zenhabits and I’m not ashamed to say. It’ll all be a bit better if we help each other out. What can I help you with? (I know a fair bit about software testing and test management, and too much about cycling :).

What will you do this year?